EDUCATIONAL SCREENINGS


"Jessica Vale's wrenching documentary examines the cultural underpinnings of sexual violence in Liberia, along with the seeming impossibility of effecting justice for its youngest victims... Vale effectively shines a light on the horrible plight of young girls and women in an often brutal, still largely tribal culture. A profoundly sad but eye opening documentary, this is recommended."  Video Librarian Magazine 2015

Now available for streaming on KANOPY!  https://www.kanopystreaming.com/product/small-small-thing-olivia-zinnah-story

Small Small Thing

Directed by Jessica Vale
Produced by Nika Offenbac & Jessica Vale
Over 10 festival awards and TV premiere on Al Jazeera English

Released: 2014
Running time: 84 mins
English and local dialects with English captions
NTSC DVD

Subjects: Women/Gender Studies, African Studies, Human Rights, Female Medicine

Please note: Educational purchases from this site include limited PPR. INSTITUTIONAL and PUBLIC PERFORMANCE RIGHTS (“PPR”) are rights which allow screenings of DVDs or digital versions for educational purposes. Any school use or non-theatrical public showing of “Small Small Thing” must include the purchase of PPR at the price indicated on our website. Purchase of PPR permits screening in a classroom or library or to a public group of less than 50 people when no admission is charged. If admission is charged or if the group is more than 50 people, please contact sales@smallsmallthing.com to arrange a commercial film booking.

 
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Rape is dirty, rape is nasty, and we have to bring that nasty conversation into open spaces. Take it to churches, mosques, schools, government buildings. Bring men into the conversation…whether you find yourself in the north, south, east, or west, it’s time for people to join hands and see rape not just as a women’s issue, but as an issue that is effecting society. It’s one of the diseases that our societies have that we need to get rid of.
— Leymah Gbowee, Liberian activist and Nobel Laureate